The Hiring Experience

Improving the Hiring Journey

November 02, 2023 Max & Mike Episode 17
The Hiring Experience
Improving the Hiring Journey
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered why the traditional approach to hiring often leads to a disconnect in understanding the job? Let's unravel this mystery. Join Max and Mike as they dissect the hiring process, highlighting the pitfalls of relying solely on resumes and advocating for a shift toward a more transparent and informative hiring journey. 

In this episode, we dive into how interviews should be a platform to expand on knowledge, rather than a basic information gathering session. We argue that job role information should be shared earlier in the process, fostering a non-pressure situation that encourages truthful answers. Tune in as we challenge conventional strategies and share advice on how to enhance your ability to attract, select, and retain the best talent.

We love to hear your hiring experience, whether you're a hiring manager with 100s of hires, about to make your first hire, or an applicant that has a story to tell. Share your stories with Max & Mike at hiringexperiencepod@gmail.com

This podcast and the matters discussed herein are for informational purposes only and should not to be construed as advice for a particular company or person. This podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional or legal advice.

Speaker 1:

This is the Hiring Experience the podcast that helps you break down the art and science of hiring. Hosted by Max and Mike friends, founders and creators of rapid hiring, on a mission to bring an end to the resume, bringing you tactical advice to help you attract, select and retain the best talent. This podcast and the matters discussed herein are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as advice for a particular company or person. This podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional or legal advice.

Mike:

All right. So I think today we're going to talk a little bit more detail about really understanding the candidate process when people are applying for jobs at your company, and a little bit about what the process looks like on your side when you actually go to review those candidates. So what that means is typically what we see and what I see in conversation with people is I have business owners or HR managers or anyone really that's responsible for candidate review when their company is hiring. Typically, the process looks like putting your job description out there, however, whatever form it takes we talk a lot about the job description in other episodes. We're not going to get into that too much today, but putting that out there and then collecting your resumes for your candidates. And these resumes you're typically looking for where somebody may have worked before, where somebody's education may have come from, and in doing that you make an evaluation on that person from that limited information and decide whether you're going to conduct an interview, and then the interview becomes more of like a question-answer discovery period. When we think of interviews, we like to think of them more like you've progressed the knowledge to a point where you would like to think that, if you're going to take the time to interview somebody, you're closer to hiring than not, and in this process that's not really possible given the fact that you don't really know anything at this point in time when you schedule the interview. So now we're just kind of rolling the dice and we're doing discovery effectively with your candidates, and what this leads to is a bit of a disconnect when we get into understanding the job.

Mike:

So we find that the interview is where a lot of hiring managers will ask if somebody is willing to do a few job-specific things or whatever specifics would be required for your role. These things come out as questions in the interview and we feel that Not even we feel it just is detrimental to do it in this manner. There's a time to ask questions where somebody feels more comfortable answering them, right. So if you ask a question to somebody that it's very evident that if I ask you point blank in your interview If you're willing to work a 12-hour shift because our roles sometimes extend and yada, yada, whatever you understand at that point that an answer of no is likely going to make you unqualified for this role.

Mike:

You've now spent the time to come to this interview, so you're more likely to give the favorable answer, for both your own self-preservation and you know just our human nature to have approval of other people, and they ask questions, so the truthful answer may not be the answer that you give, whereas if this type of information is discovered before an interview process whether it's some type of question-answer period or even like as simple as an email, just like Following up on an application that there's, there's tools in place for this. We actually have, you know, our own set of tools in place, but you can have it as simple at some type of email no pressure and no commitment system where these types of things can be determined beforehand, you're much more likely to get a truthful answer and you don't end up with people that don't understand their role after they're hired and Cause that type of issue down the line right.

Max:

I think a lot of what Mike is touching on here is an element that the interviewer is sitting there in a information gathering mode and mindset of. We have some sort of mental checklist of things that may or may be arbitrary to the role and, because of using an old-school resume approach, leaves to a lot of questions and not so many answers in regards to all of the nuanced positions and components of hiring for a certain position. Beyond, do they have this credential that we need? Do they have experience in this field? Those are the basics you can get out of a resume, but somebody's a desire or willingness to work a certain schedule to complete certain tasks stay longer, like Mike touched on, are things that are still just the basics of information gathering and and not a Point for getting to know the applicant, which, to us, is what an interview is for.

Max:

An interview is the in-depth elements that are either scenario driven or Pointed questions around their experience, as it relates to what you're hiring for. That's what you want to maximize your time with and not waste it on all of these things that are essential yes, no questions and that either will qualify or disqualify this person for the role and so moving that forward in your application process helps you, helps the candidates, because people want to know what the role is and if the role involves working weekends, working nights, working long hours, overtime, etc. That may not be the role for them, because they have a family, they have whatever commitments they need to meet or they just don't want to do it, and that's fine. But if you aren't screening for that component early enough, then the people applying to the job may just assume it's a Monday to Friday gig, because unless people know the schedule of the role, they are unlikely to assume anything other than just a regular full time, even though there are so many roles out there that aren't on some sort of shift rotation, required long days etc.

Mike:

The other thing there is. Like you know, it's not enough to simply list these things like this, this role XYZ bullet point like these are the requirements, anything to engage with these candidates beforehand and in a way that they could answer in a non pressure situation.

Max:

I think a lot of that comes down to that, when we talk to employers, that they'll say that we put the schedules in the job description. But if they do put it in there, they'll put it in a way that it's for them. It'll be in some sort of shorthand that makes no sense to people who don't work for you already. Or it's just in one little bullet point that says occasional weekends required, which doesn't tell anybody. Is it every other weekend? Is it one weekend a year? Can you be more specific?

Max:

But on top of all of that, now that more than 70% of applicants apply for jobs, usually on their mobile phone, the applicants are not as inclined to read your really, really long job description because it just takes too long. The apply button on your job board of choice or your ATS of choice or system of choice is likely near the top, and so they don't even have to scroll to start. So they read the job title, they go through the little brackets of what I think they apply and they start so Well, yes, you could sit there and say well, if they would have read the job description. That's great. But as we talk about, taking ownership of the hiring process means to us that we have to control what we can control, and so what we do then is we take that, we put it in the application process, because if you are going to, if we can assume that they've read it, then those people will fly through the questions, no problem. If they haven't read it out there, where is to apply?

Mike:

they had to click on it and the thing is like we're not looking to put every single question information thing in the application process is a time there's a place to ask certain questions.

Mike:

But like these very rudimentary things that are essential to gauge if somebody Would be a good fit for your company, for the requirements of that role and I'm not even be a good fit for your company is just, are they good fit for the specific role you're hiring right now? You may still find some people that you know you have a role that's happens primarily outdoors and in inclement weather conditions and some people are more than happy to do that. You know the pay that comes along with. That's great. They're aware of that. Some people really don't want to do that and that's totally fine and you may find that they're well suited for role inside. But they need to know that before you ask some point blank in person and before they start the job, because if they learn that after they start the job they're probably not going to stay at that job if it doesn't line up with what they were thinking right, and then you get to start this whole process all over again.

Max:

I think the big summation of it all is that more information is better.

Mike:

sharing more information with the applicants is better, more Relevant information for sure, because we do go through, you know, in depth discussions about how asking for things and submissions and just for the sake of having more information isn't super ideal. But if this is information that's going to directly affect the outcome and you can, you can prove and show that it's directly affecting the outcome Then all of that is fundamentally better.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for listening to the Hiring Experience. We hope you enjoyed this episode and learned something new about the art and science of hiring. Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review on your favorite podcast player. This helps others discover the show. Share with a friend, colleague or anyone going through the Hiring Experience right now. Share your hiring experience with us at hiringexperiencepod at gmailcom.

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