The Hiring Experience

Unearthing the Truth in Recruitment: Insights from Rapid Hiring

November 16, 2023 Max & Mike Episode 19
The Hiring Experience
Unearthing the Truth in Recruitment: Insights from Rapid Hiring
Show Notes Transcript

What if there was a way to revolutionize the hiring process for the better? Imagine being able to shift the interview questions to the beginning, encouraging candidates to self-select if the job doesn't align with their desires and skills, reducing turnover. Max and Mike from Hussle share their insights and strategies on this fascinating topic in this podcast episode. They discuss the idea of information transparency during the hiring process, where employers are upfront about the job role, and job seekers are candid about their skills and willingness. 

Max and Mike emphasize the importance of creating an environment where truth is more likely to occur. They share their unique approach of breaking down job tasks into subtasks and questioning candidates about their comfort level with each task. This provides a composite of what you would ideally want to know about a potential employee. The duo also discuss their surprising observation that when asked pointed questions, most candidates tend to be genuinely truthful about their willingness to perform certain tasks. This episode is a treasure trove of insights for anyone involved in the hiring process. Learn how to make better and more informed decisions, leading to a more efficient and honest hiring process.

We love to hear your hiring experience, whether you're a hiring manager with 100s of hires, about to make your first hire, or an applicant that has a story to tell. Share your stories with Max & Mike at hiringexperiencepod@gmail.com

This podcast and the matters discussed herein are for informational purposes only and should not to be construed as advice for a particular company or person. This podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional or legal advice.

Speaker 1:

This is the Hiring Experience the podcast that helps you break down the art and science of hiring. Hosted by Max and Mike friends, founders and creators of rapid hiring, on a mission to bring an end to the resume, bringing you tactical advice to help you attract, select and retain the best talent. This podcast and the matters discussed herein are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as advice for a particular company or person. This podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional or legal advice.

Mike:

So, like how I typically explain things for the skills and job understanding is that we really want to have people understand the role but be able to answer those questions in the privacy of their own space without the commitment to you. Already, Like they're not answering. Like his big thing when I was speaking with him was you know, they do cold calling there Right, Like they call people who have bought from them. They call people who had it respectively by from them.

Mike:

You know his thing was I want to call somebody. It's like if you were calling me and saying, you know, hey, just call in to see we've done three jobs, three in the past. I just wanted to call and you know make sure that?

Max:

Yeah, re-engaging the campaigns and stuff like that.

Mike:

You know bubble blunders, checking in If there's anything that you need in the future, I'm your guy kind of thing, right, like those. That's one version of the calling that they're doing and then, in addition to that, they're doing true cold outreach. But that's part of their outreach strategy. But it's also asked in the interview whether they're comfortable with calling in that capacity, right, right.

Mike:

What I try to get through to people is effectively that if you ask somebody something face to face, like even if it's as simple as are you willing to work weekends? Right, if you come in for an interview with me now, a couple of things have happened. We've scheduled the interview, you've committed to coming, you've spent some time coming and now you have this. You know you have this vested interest in being successful at it because your time is invested right, right. So if I ask you face to face if you're comfortable working weekends or you're willing to work weekends, the likely answer is going to be yes, because there's that, you know. I know very evidently, if I say no, I'm not getting this job Good, job, right. So it's like you're going to get the answer you want to hear most of the time Right, right. So now we really focus on moving that type of thing forwards in the process, so that you're not getting the preferred answer. You're getting a truthful answer.

Max:

Right. So, like I take that a step further in the process of making it more than just one point blank question, because you can start with the super direct of will you do X? But then you can also do related questions about somebody's comfortability with the tasks that are involved in doing that thing, because anything can be broken down for almost every task that you do in a job, right, and be broken down into sub tasks and smaller and smaller tasks, and so each of those you can actually address individually. And so it gives you that, but it gives you like what you're talking about. It gives you that composite of what you would want to know, because now you have the ability to see like, all right, they can do this, they'll do this, they'll do this, so they'll do seven of the eight things that are actually required, or they're comfortable doing seven of the eight things that are actually required in that role or and to complete that task, which is probably pretty good, because if they're self assessing that, the answer might be a little bit lower, but it's not at least one out of eight, because you will get people and, like we're always, I think we used to talk about a lot more when we started, this was how genuinely surprised we were with because people, especially with like prototypes of things and everything else, people were always genuinely truthful about what they were willing to do.

Max:

It was always somebody else, people's employers. Pushback was always that like, oh, they're just gonna lie and I'm like, honestly, we found that when people are asked point point questions that are very explicit, very, very pointed, they are truthful in their reflection of it, because the only thing we're good at assessing as ourselves Well, that's the thing too, like when we look at the truthfulness factor.

Mike:

We have to give an environment where it's more likely for the truth to occur right, by moving these types of questions out forward in the process. And they're not sitting in front of somebody, they're not looking for that human approval, they don't have vested interest in that in the result of the thing. Right, these are all factors that would make it more or less likely to be truthful when asked to question Right. So once we strip those away and really give somebody no downside like you're at job application stage, you have 30 seconds invested and there's 100 other jobs you could apply for Right, probably pick the one that's going to suit you. If you're asked a certain thing that you don't agree with, like working a weekend for a very high level example and you're like I don't want to, I'm just going to move on right. Like there's no other BS involved.

Max:

No. And then there's also, like you said, right, you get people that self-select out in the process because they, just like you said, they move on, because it's an obvious answer, like the answer is like, if you're willing to do this and if maybe you're the perfect candidate in every other dimension, some companies might still consider it.

Mike:

Well, yeah and it's not. It doesn't have to be yes or no. Like the example I give people because it's very easy to see is like I use working 12-hour days or working weekends is like very high level examples and say, like you know, this role requires working weekends. What is your comfort level with this? A, I love working weekends. I'll work every weekend. B, I prefer to work weekdays, but you know, I'll work some weekends. And C, I'll never work a weekend in my life. And like we engage what somebody's comfort level is, but what this effectively does is reduce your turnover, right? Because if you come into your interview and you answer that question untruthfully and then once you start your role, I'm like, okay, Saturday's here, you got to work, and then there's a problem with that, you know, then it creates an environment where turnover happens.

Max:

Right, and it's just that continued like notion that we always want to stress on, like getting to the point of what you're trying to find out and getting the insights that you need to make actionable decisions so they don't get lost in the part where they sign up for a job that they think is different than what it is.

Mike:

Yeah, information transparency really on both sides, like we have a responsibility as employers to be transparent as to what the position entails and you should have a responsibility as a job seeker to be transparent with what you are willing to do and what your skill sets are.

Max:

Like it's just, if it's not for you, it's fine. Like there are a lot of jobs out there that will fit. Okay, dear. Like if you never want to work, well, we probably can't help you, but if you're looking for a role, there's probably a role that will fit, like I need. I want to work Sunday to Thursday. I want to work Wednesday to Sunday, like you can. There is actually always roles like retail stores that are open, or restaurants, retail stores, hair salons there's a lot of different businesses out there that are closed Sunday, monday or only open till three o'clock or the like. And like the more info we can put out there in these things, the more accurate and better decisions that people applying to the jobs can make. Because I think some people put it out there like that they're almost trying to trick people into applying because that's how they're going to get all the good applicants. Like, well, if we tell them all those things, they're not going to apply.

Mike:

I was like, but if you tell them all those things and they don't tell them, and then they apply and then they find out after they're just going to leave anyways, because that's not the job they signed up for yeah, and I mean, like, the other thing I've been telling people to here and they have to realize is we're under this notion, that I put it in the job description right Means that the person applying has read every bullet point of your job description, agrees with them all, has applied them to themselves and then only then submit their application right, reflected on all of them. Yeah, so like, only at that point have they submitted their application. And then, as like employers, we get mad. It's like, well, I said this in the job description. This person doesn't have that. It's like, well, you know, first of all, is it a requirement to agree with every point in the job description to apply? We don't know, it doesn't say it. Is there any flexibility on the bullet points?

Max:

I don't know, it doesn't say it Needs, could have like what are you looking for here?

Mike:

Yeah. So I mean In what, like what we've done is obviously a step in the right direction in resolving this issue of information Transparency, and I think that's the main thing is really just making the process Accountable for both parties, like what do you want and what do you have? Because it's pretty straightforward, it's not that hard to solve, but but it seems to be this, this problem where everyone's got their information close to their chest. I don't want to share it, but then you got to work together after it, so why not just?

Max:

tell everyone what you want. It's like, until I hire you, I can't show you what the job is.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so I don't want it then, and no, it's definitely that.

Max:

The job description point is something we've talked about before, but we also talk with people all the time about it that it just they're also not.

Max:

I think we receptive to the fact a lot of times that, like the person applying to your job, the unless it's some super highly specialized role that this, this is the only kind of job they can apply for and you're the only person around who hires for it. You can probably bet they've applied to ten other jobs that day and a hunt if they're looking actively 50 in the last week or two. They don't remember every bullet point of every job description because then they wouldn't actually have time to work and apply for a job, because the odds are they're probably employed and they're looking for a new job, but they don't have time to read your three-page job description that is filled with all the fluff of how fantastic every business is and like I'm not saying that businesses aren't fantastic and your place isn't a great place to work, but nobody is taking the time to read all that because they don't have time to do it, because then they don't have time to apply.

Mike:

Expecting people to be like well, if they want to work here, they should do this and this. It's like well, if you want them to work there, you should probably do this as well. You know.

Max:

Do a little more right, like and it's always, it's always this back and forth that it's always on the person looking for the job and Not on the employer side, but it's really it's a balance of both, obviously. But the funny thing is how all of that has translated into Well, because we've made reading the job description so long and so time consuming, or else, so now we just need to make the application as simple and straightforward as possible, and so it's just one click, just one. Just click a button. Toss your name in a pile. We're gonna pull a name out of a hat. Maybe you come for an interview. It's actually.

Max:

You could just do the opposite, like make your job description shorter, because they're not gonna read it anyways. Make your application process just a teeny tiny bit longer, like not 20 minutes, but like doesn't have to be 10 seconds to 10 seconds to input your email in your first name and you know at least your last name and Make it more pointed. And then, all of a sudden, you get all this information. They get information, you get information. Everyone is better off now because they know what they've applied to. They could stop applying if they've determined it's not for them.

Mike:

I mean, if you want to, if you want to learn what all this information looks like, feel free to Reach out, because we can. We can really show you what it looks like to receive pointed information. And I mean, you know we don't we don't plug our product in our, in our podcast, but we At some point, you know, we've solved this problem for people and If you are interested in us solving this problem for you, then by all means give give us a call because, like, even just for A little bit of information around it, you don't have to buy stuff from us. You can reach out just to ask some more questions around how to gather the right pointed information.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for listening to the hiring experience. We hope you enjoyed this episode and learned something new about the art and science of hiring. Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review on your favorite podcast player. This helps others discover the show. Share with a friend, colleague or anyone going through the hiring experience right now. Share your hiring experience with us at hiringexperiencepod at gmailcom.